Jon Crispin's Notebook

Any Botanists Out There?

Posted in biology, Science by joncrispin on 22/05/2015

This will be quick as I am off to Rotterdam to work on the suitcases.  I was walking the dog in the woods this morning and saw this beautiful object.  Looks to me that the little black dots might be eggs of some sort.  But oh, that green!  Could any of you with botanist friends send this around?  I’d love to know what it is.

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Willard Tour / Cemetery / Names / Thoughts – Part 2

Posted in History, mental illness, psychiatric centers by joncrispin on 19/05/2015

(See part 1 here.)

It was interesting to me to find out that it was OMH itself that tracked down Lawrence Mocha’s distant relatives.  According to Mr. Allen, his office used every means possible to locate Lawrence’s family in order to get permission to release his surname, which in turn allowed his full name to be used on the plaque on the cemetery grounds.  In my conversation with Mr Allen, he explicitly said that surnames could be released if a representative of the family could vouch that there was no objection to releasing that name.  OMH would send documents that would need to be signed in order to guarantee family acceptance, but as in the case of Lawrence’s family, it would not need to be a direct descendent who signs those papers. (Lawrence did not appear to have any children.)  This is a huge development for any family members who seek information about relatives that lived in state Psychiatric Centers.  Again, massive credit goes to Colleen Spellecy and her group for getting OMH to move on this.  It would be naive for anyone to think that any of this would have ever happened without her hard work.  What was especially amazing to me was that towards the end of the ceremony, members of the committee read the actual names of over 100 patients who were buried at Willard.  And Colleen has a list of 500 more families that have agreed to the release of names.

After the ceremony I had a very nice chat with Anna Kern, whose father’s mother’s maiden name was Mocha, and if I am correct ,was a cousin of Lawrence.  She and her husband travelled from Minnesota to be at the ceremony, and  Anna was genuinely moved by the fact that people were acknowledging her long forgotten family member.  I was also able to introduce myself to Darby Penny whose work on the suitcases preceded my own access to the collection.  It was an interesting conversation, as our goals differ greatly, and I believe we have a fundamental disagreement about the role the state played in the treatment of people with conditions that led them to a life at Willard.  I think it is very obvious to anyone who views my work vis a vis hers what those differences are.  Darby’s book and site are worth checking out if you want to get an idea of her approach to the suitcases.

I was going to write a bit about my feelings of seeing so much attention focused on Willard, but I think I’ll save it for later, as I am still sorting it all out.  But I did want to mention something really great that happened as I was leaving to drive home.  Several weeks ago I was contacted by Clarissa B‘s niece Christine.  She was moved to get in touch after she stumbled across this site and realized that Clarissa was actually her aunt.  Somewhere in the comments on that post, someone wrote that it was a shame that people like Clarissa were forgotten.  Chris wanted to correct that idea.  What she told me was that even as a patient at Willard, Aunt Clarissa spent quite a lot of time visiting her family, especially during holidays.  As a child, Chris enjoyed seeing her, and it was important to her to let people know that she was decidedly not forgotten.  So just before getting into my car to head home, I read an email from Chris that she had taken the tour and was herself about to leave.  We managed to meet on the side of route 132A and have a lovely conversation.

One last thing I want to mention.  I am just a photographer who has been given an incredible opportunity to document the Willard Suitcases.  Though I have developed strong opinions about what Willard was all about, I work very hard to separate those feelings from my work as a photographer.  Mental illness is a hugely complex issue, and ultimately I have no interest in using my work to make a point about what the state did or didn’t do in regards to the people who lived at Willard.  I just hope that my photographs can give a little bit of life back to those folks, and allow them to be defined as something more than just people with a mental illness.  Thanks to all of you for following along, and giving me such incredible motivation and support.

Willard Tour / Cemetery / Names / Thoughts – Part 1

Posted in Asylums, History, Mental Health, suitcases by joncrispin on 19/05/2015

This year’s tour of the former Willard Psychiatric Center was overwhelming in many ways. (See my post about 2014.) It was clear that the crowds would be large when, about a mile from the site, traffic was completely stopped on Route 96A. I ended up parking in the Grandview lot. Those of you who are familiar with Willard will know where that is in relation to the facility. Someone mentioned that social media might have had something to do with the crowds as there were a lot of Facebook posts going around. There has never been this kind of turnout for a tour.
I had hoped to meet up with some folks who follow this site, but the crowds made it nearly impossible.

My main reason for being there was to attend the ceremony honoring the gravedigger and former patient Lawrence Mocha.

Colleen Spellecy’s group has done an amazing job, not just in pressuring the New York State Office of Mental Health to allow Lawrence’s surname to be used, but in cleaning up the site and uncovering the markers placed in lieu of headstones.  Here is a link to her group’s site.  I can’t stress enough how her drive and dedication to honor the folks buried at the cemetery made this happen.  There is currently a bill before the legislature (S840 / A6386) to allow the release of names of patients, and if you live in New York State, Colleen has made it easy to contact your local representative.  Here is a link to the page on her site where you can click to send a message to your rep.

I also want to mention Lin Stuhler’s hard work in pressuring legislators to introduce a bill that would release the names of patients buried in psych center cemeteries.  Here is a link to Lin’s site.  Anyone interested in her work should buy her book, The Inmates of Willard, which you can order through her site or on Amazon.  She could really use your support, as dealing with the state bureaucracy can be a draining experience, and she has really hung in there to move this ahead.

Lawrence’s grave marker was identified by someone who knew its location, so the committee was able to have an exact location of his burial.  It was lovely to see groups of people standing near the spot and honoring his memory.  Just how this all happened is still amazing, really.  I won’t go into a long summary here, as I am not familiar with all the ins and outs.  But in a nutshell, Colleen had been working for years to get Lawrence’s name made public.  It wasn’t until an article appeared in The New York Times last November that OMH felt compelled to cooperate with her.

This whole naming thing is something that has been frustrating to me and others.  I am able to see both sides of the argument, but I am still strongly favor being able to use surnames when talking about the patients.  I understand the idea that some shame is attached to those who have suffered from a mental illness, but I feel it is dehumanizing to not identify them.  And for families that want to learn more about their ancestors, it is important to be able to access records.  I get contacted almost daily by relatives asking if I have photographed a suitcase belonging to a family member.

That being said, it seems that OMH is apparently now more open to providing information about former patients.  John B. Allen, Jr, who is Special Assistant to the Commissioner, told me explicitly to post his name and contact information so that family members can learn more about their relatives.  The telephone number is  518 473 6579 and his email is John.Allen@omh.ny.gov.

I want to write so much more about this, but I have to run out to check out the historic Pelham Town Hall building, which I will be photographing soon.  So I will post this now, and continue with part two in a few hours.  I haven’t had time to proof read this, so pardon any typos.  I will catch them later.

Hummingbird

Posted in Birds, hummingbirds by joncrispin on 14/05/2015

The hummingbirds are back in full force.  This fellow with the beautiful red throat was the first one I’d seen this year, and he showed up about a week ago.  All the feeders are going strong and there are now a (collective noun?) of them around.  We once read that you should have at least 2 feeders as they are quite territorial.  We now have 3 and they chase each other around chirping like mad.  They are not shy at all; I was basically standing right next to the feeder to get this shot.

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Olive’s First Birthday

Posted in Dogs, Labrador Retrievers, Labradors, puppies by joncrispin on 14/05/2015

Olive is one year old today.

There were three yellows in the litter, and one was a bit darker than the other two.  Olive is one of the lighter ones, but we are not exactly sure which of the two Michele is holding is she.  You can see her mom Rose looking on.  I took the puppy photos with my phone when they were 2 days old.  We love Olive so much.  She is a great dog.

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Willard Suitcases / Margaret D. / Uniforms

Posted in Abandoned Buildings, History, Institutions, Mental Health, nurses uniforms by joncrispin on 14/05/2015

We are still working on Margaret D’s cases.  This is the second batch of nursing uniforms that we have photographed.  She worked in various hospitals in Upstate New York before coming to Willard as a patient.

All of her things are in good condition, and these garments are all clean and moderately starched.

As I grew up in Meadville, PA (home of Talon Zippers!), I always look at any that are in the collection.  It was by far the most popular of all zippers throughout most of the 20th Century.  Many of my friend’s parents worked for the company.

I leave tomorrow for the open house that takes place at Willard on Saturday.  I will be spending time at the cemetery, and hanging out at the Romulus Historical Society building with Peggy Ellsworth, who is a former Willard employee and trustee of the historical society.  If you are attending the event, please track me down and introduce yourselves.  I hope to see you there.

Mushrooms

Posted in Food, Jon Crispin, mushrooms by joncrispin on 06/05/2015

Cristine has some fantastic former students.  One of them is Sarah Berquist who is now a lecturer at UMASS.  Along with her partner, she also has a  mushroom business.  So we occasionally get fresh, interesting mushrooms for dinner.  These guys showed up last night in a brown paper bag.  Like most other photos to do with the natural world that I post here, I have no idea what these are called.  But fried up in butter, they tasted great.

Nepal

Posted in Uncategorized by joncrispin on 01/05/2015

I rarely do this sort of thing here, but this is pretty important.  Below is a letter Cristine sent to friends and family about how to help out with the tragic situation in Nepal.  It is self-explanatory, but I want to add a few things.  World Education is a fantastic organization that is not affiliated with any religion or government.  The key here is that 100% of the money sent will get to Nepal to people who can be trusted to distribute it fairly.  If you are looking for a way to help, this would be a great way to do so.

Hello, family and friends.  I don’t usually do this, but as you all probably know, Nepal is close to my heart, since I lived there as a Peace Corps volunteer in 1979 and 1980 and have worked on a number of girls’ and women’s education projects there ever since.  So I’m feeling uncharacteristically bold in reaching out to people. The earthquake has been devastating in a place so poor; luckily, all of the people with whom I am still in contact seem to be OK and are joining the relief effort.  The town I lived in is not so far from the epicenter in Gorkha, and I fear that as the roads are cleared and we start to get a picture of what has happened outside of Kathmandu, the extent of the devastation will be tremendous.  

I have a close friend, Chij Shrestha, who I first met in 1979 and with whom I worked for many, many years on World Education’s projects in Nepal. World Education is the non-profit organization I worked with before I came to UMass Amherst, and I still serve on the Board of Directors.  Chij lives in Kathmandu, is retired from World Education, but has started a community organization for the area surrounding his home in Bandipur with 22 Dalit families who live in his neighborhood.  The Dalits are the “untouchable” caste in Nepal, the poorest of the poor.  Chij has set up an early childhood education center for these families, and I have heard from him that he will be working directly with these families in the rescue effort, as almost all of their houses were destroyed during the quake.

I wrote to the president of World Education, Joel Lamstein, a good friend of mine and our family, to see if they could facilitate donations directly to Chij and the work he supports with Dalits.  Joel decided the best way to proceed would be to put up a banner on the World Education website so people could donate directly; 100% of all of the contributions will go immediately and directly to Chij and the groups in Nepal that he and World Education work with.  I’m going to donate (from Jon and me) through this because I know for a fact that every dollar will go directly into the hands of the Chij and other people I know there, directly to people with whom he works.  

So I’m sending you this link:  http://www.worlded.org/WEIInternet/donate/index.cfm. If you would like to donate anything, knowing that your money will get directly to people who are hurting, please do.  If not, that’s fine, too.  Please don’t feel obligated.  Just an avenue, if you are interested.  

If you do donate, even a little, as you fill out the form, when you get to the box that says “Donate to a specific project”, write in “Chij Shrestha at the Nepal Relief Fund”.

I will keep in contact with Chij and keep you posted about what is happening there, whenever I hear from him and whenever I can.

Thanks for caring.  Love, Cris

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Willard Suitcases / Margaret D / Update

Posted in crochet, embroidery, History, Mental Health, needle work, tatting by joncrispin on 29/04/2015

One of the loveliest aspects of my work on the suitcases is connecting with wonderful, smart, and knowledgable people.  After this morning’s post, I received a comment from Dhyan about the photograph.  You can read her comment here. (Scroll down to see it.)  She seemed to know so much about the subject that I emailed her a full resolution image of this wider shot.  Here is her response.  I am sure she won’t mind me reprinting it.

Jon, Thanks!!!

I enlarged the picture to 500% and took a really close look at it. Here are some other things I notice.

Top Right: I believe that band was probably done as “draw work” Some of the threads are selectively pulled out and the rest are used to make the patterns using an embroidery thread to hold them in place.

Did you notice how beautifully woven the folded fabric on the right is? You don’t see THAT any more. My grandmothers had some table cloths that looked like that. How they could ever bring themselves to put them on the table with grandkids around is a mystery to me! I do believe they were heavier handed with Clorox in those days!

I noticed at the bottom there is a line that says “Royal Society No 5….” That probably means that she bought this piece of fabric from an embroidery fabric company. Probably the zig zag line was already on the fabric when she bought it but the pattern she would have filled in is above it and probably on other parts of the fabric as well.

The blue edging is crochet. Because the pattern is penciled in or stamped on, I wonder if that was already on the piece when she bought it but maybe not. Still I think I would have done the pattern first and the edging last so maybe it was on there already. She may have been bringing pieces of uncompleted work to do at the asylum.

One more thing. The piece between the blue edging and the left edge piece, that looks like a lace border, maybe the top of a camisole, is tatting. I have actually never seen tatting done but I know you have a kind of spindle that looks a bit like a guitar pick and by going over and under and around the through you make those edgings. Look at the VERY edge that is not crochet which is why I think it is tatting.

The only thing that is a bit bothersome if the green embroidery with the colored flowers. That is not up to the quality of the rest of her work. Wonder what the story is with that?

Anyway, thank you so much for showing it to me. I loved looking at it. People don’t know much about embroidery these days. I once had the opportunity to look at a very, several-hundreds-of-years old embroidered Chinese jacket and spend about an hour pointing out details to the owners. It was silk, Jon, with tinier stitches than I had ever seen.

Anyway, thank you again for a lovely half hour of procrastination! J

Dhyan

Dhyan, I am not sure if you were aware of her history, but Margaret was Scottish by birth and didn’t come to the States until she was a young adult.  I would guess that she acquired her skills with the needle before arriving here.

It is a good time for me to thank all of you who are following this project. I really do feel close to those of you who comment, and pay so much attention to this unique collection.  Cheers, Jon

Willard Suitcases / Margaret D. / Tour

Posted in History, Mental Health, Willard Asylum, Willard Suitcases by joncrispin on 29/04/2015

Yesterday Peg noticed some of Margaret D’s handiwork with a needle.  And here is one of those needles, still in place where she last used it.  I have no idea what this process is called, but it looks quite intricate.

The annual public tour of Willard is on for Saturday the 16th of May.  It is a fundraiser for the Elizabeth Cady Stanton Children’s Center.  Here is a link to their Facebook page.  I would advise getting there very early, as this is a wildly popular event.  Tours are run at 9.00 am and 1.00 pm.  And if you have never experienced a central New York State chicken bbq, I would advise you to get some tickets for it.  Also that day, a memorial service will be held at the cemetery across the street honoring Lawrence Mocha, who as a patient dug many of the graves.  That event takes place at 11.00 am and should be interesting.

I will be there for much of the day, and would be most happy if those of you who follow this project would come up and say hello.  If  former Willard employee Peggy Ellsworth is in charge at the morgue again this year, I will probably hang out with her much of the time.

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