Jon Crispin's Notebook

Willard Suitcases / Josephine S

Posted in Willard Asylum, Willard Suitcases by joncrispin on 24/12/2014

A few days ago I started getting a great deal of email from people who had seen the project somewhere online.  I am not really sure of the source, but am always pleased to hear from folks.  I think I tracked down the article, but it did have some really glaring errors, and attributed some things to me that I never would have said.  I hesitate to post a link, as it is one of those conglomeration sites with some tacky ads and links.

But the good part is that I am hearing from some wonderful people who are sharing their stories with me.  I really appreciate it, and am grateful that the project is reaching new viewers.

Hallway / Suitcases

Posted in Asylums, History, motels, Willard Asylum, Willard Suitcases by joncrispin on 07/12/2014

I am in a motel in Erie, PA on my way to Wittenberg University where I will be spending the next few days talking to faculty and students about the suitcase project.  I am really excited about this and owe a debt of thanks to my friend Peter Wray for reconnecting me to Witt.

Willard Suitcases / Joseph A / Peggy Ross

Posted in Willard Asylum, Willard Suitcases by joncrispin on 24/11/2014

I was back in Rotterdam at the storage facility shooting suitcases this past Friday.  The last time I was there, Peggy and I were only able to get part way through Joseph A’s possessions, and I was really eager to finish up.  I posted about that day here.  Most of what was in his two large trunks was clothing, and as I have said before, setting up this sort of shot is difficult for me.

Thank goodness for Peg.  I have mentioned before just how important she is to the project.  I probably would have never done the second Kickstarter without her, or for that matter, even thought about shooting all 400 of the suitcases.  Friday was a good case in point.  Every single article of clothing in Joseph’s collection had been assigned a catalogue number by the museum.  This meant taking the objects out of their archival boxes, keeping track of the small pieces of paper on which those numbers were written, hiding the numbers in the folds of the clothes so they weren’t visible in the photographs, setting up the shot, taking the photographs, rematching all the numbers with the articles, and finally putting them back into their designated storage boxes.  We worked for about four hours on this one trunk; had I been alone it would have taken days.

And in addition to all of this detail work, she helps to organize the shots, and sees things that I would otherwise miss.  When we were putting Joseph’s clothes away, she pointed out that his initials had been embroidered onto the collar of his pajamas, and it makes for a lovely picture.

So a huge thank you to Peg for her organizational skills, hard work, and dedication to the project.  I couldn’t do this without her.

Willard Suitcases / Thelma R

Posted in Jon Crispin, Willard Asylum, Willard Suitcases by joncrispin on 11/11/2014

I have been working hard to continue uploading suitcases to the willardsuitcases site.  I have just put up Thelma R’s case and it is one of my favorites.  For those of you who are new to the project, you can see what is up so far here.

Willard Suitcases / Joseph A. and a presentation in Auburn, NY

Posted in Willard Asylum, Willard Suitcases by joncrispin on 31/10/2014

I am back shooting suitcases after a bit of a break.  Peg has been traveling as have I, and it feels great to be working on the project again. / Joseph A. has a huge number of items in the collection.  There were about 15 museum boxes in one of the big storage containers.  It is always a bit intimidating with so many artifacts, especially when a large number of the items are clothing.  In Joseph’s case it was interesting because half of the clothes were women’s.  It wasn’t until we got deep into the setup that we found this card with the “Wife’s clothing” writing on it.  As with most of the information that we glean from the objects, we can only guess the circumstances of Joseph’s admission to Willard.  In this case though, it is very likely that his wife was deceased and he brought all her things with him.  (This included a ton of household items such as sheets, towels, napkins, etc.)  Very sad and touching.

I will be presenting the project at the Seward House Museum in Auburn, NY on (next) Wednesday the 5th of November.  The event is at the Auburn Public Theatre at 7.00 PM and there is a $10.00 admission fee ($5.00 for members).  I will also be talking about my NY State prison documentation project.  If you follow this blog, please come up and say hi.  It would be great to meet you.

Foundling Update / Willard Suitcases

Posted in Willard Asylum, Willard Suitcases by joncrispin on 15/10/2014

There is a nice comment on the Foundling post from Nikki Soppelsa.  She reminded me that she was indeed one of the people who told me about the collection in London.  Check out her great blog here.  And thanks Nikki.  Also my friend Connie Frisbee Houde sent me the link about the fabric exhibit at The Foundling.

These hair pins were in a case when I last shot in Rotterdam.  I don’t have my notes with me to credit the owner, but I’ll try to update when I am back in the studio.

I also wanted to mention that the folks at outhistory.org sent me an interesting link about Lucy Ann Lobdell, who was a patient at Willard.  And Claire Potter posted about the project on their blog.  Thanks to Jonathan Ned Katz and Claire.

Willard Suitcases / 2 October

Posted in Travel, Uncategorized, Willard Asylum, Willard Suitcases by joncrispin on 03/10/2014

Peg and I had a very productive day yesterday.  We made it through an entire storage box of suitcases; we must have shot at least 14.  Most were close to being empty.  This safety pin was (barely) holding one of the ribbons that secures items on the bottom of the case.  It is a lovely shade of green.  This case belonged to Mary E. B.

I am sitting in terminal 3 at Heathrow waiting to be picked up by John Wilson.  Nice to be back in England.

The Columbia Center for Archaeology

Posted in Willard Suitcases by joncrispin on 26/09/2014

I took the train into New York City (125th Street Station) yesterday to speak to faculty and students at The Columbia Center for Archaeology.  One of the (newly tenured!) faculty, Zoe Crossland, had been an early supporter of the suitcases, and through her I was introduced to Brian Boyd, who directs the center.  I spoke there two years ago and really enjoyed interacting with the whole group.  When I present to organizations like this, I get so much positive feedback that it really fuels me to keep going.  Yesterday, it was mostly grad students and faculty and I was thrilled to interact with folks who are so involved in their own projects. As the shooting begins to wind down, I hope to be able to spend a lot of time at colleges and universities talking about the collection.  So thanks to Zoe and Brian.  It was a great experience.

TEDx Martha’s Vineyard

Posted in Art, Asylums, Boats, Landscape, Ships, Transportation, Travel, Willard Suitcases by joncrispin on 21/08/2014

I’m back from the TEDx event at the Vineyard.  It was an intense couple of days and was really interesting.  Aside from my usual anxiety about presenting the project to people, my biggest concern was how to get 10 20 x 24 inch framed prints from my house to the venue.  It all worked out, but it was a bit nerve wracking.

I was really happy that I was only showing prints, and not doing a formal presentation.  I travel around and talk about the suitcases quite a lot, but mostly in give and take type of situations.  The idea of standing up and delivering a 15 minute presentation still seems a bit intimidating.  It was really helpful though to watch how others talk about their work in this type of format, and I learned a ton about how I want to refine my presentations.

Here’s Jon Ronson giving his talk.  I had read “The Psychopath Test” and seen “The Men Who Stare at Goats” and was happy to get the chance to hang out with him.  So many creative and stimulating people were a part of the event, and the organizers did a great job setting up time for the participants to relax and talk about our work.  It was an honor to be asked to a part of it and I am really grateful to all involved, especially Katy Decker who is an amazing bundle of energy and sweetness.  It was also fantastic that my dear friend Sue Jackson, her husband Rick, and their friend Joanie made the trip over from the Cape.  It meant so much to me to have familiar faces there.

The Vineyard is a really lovely place and as I hadn’t been there in years, it was great to be back.

It was only slightly weird that since the President was in residence for his vacation, the Coast Guard was out in force.  I would guess it was just for training purposes, but there were three chase boats that shadowed us back to Wood’s Hole and it felt a bit strange to see a manned 50 caliber machine gun so near to the ferry.

I am hoping to post more here over the next week.  Thanks, as usual, for following.

Willard Suitcases / John H / News

Posted in Asylums, Willard Asylum, Willard Suitcases by joncrispin on 18/07/2014

Peggy and I are were back shooting last week, and found John H’s case to be really interesting.  More cutlery and lots of tools and knives.

I wanted to mention that I have been asked to participate in a TEDx event on Martha’s Vineyard on the 19th of August.  Details here.  I am very excited about this as I will be showing prints and getting the chance to meet some very interesting people.  If any of you are able to make it, I’d be happy to see you.

Also, there is some interesting action going on in regards to the cemetery which I posted about before.  Here is a link to an online petition that is trying to memorialize Lawrence Mocha.

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